All posts tagged paid links

Google Product Extentions: U.S. School Supply

us-school-supply

I’ve pointed out product extensions before as a great way to increase AdWord effectiveness. Here’s another example of how powerful they can appear in relation to a growing number of product photos in the limited ad space Google provides. U.S. School Supply not only gets the usual blurb with the usual link, but five additional links, photos of product and price listings… all for no difference in the CPC (cost per click).

You can read more about enabling Google Product Extensions here.

Oh, and did you notice the stars in the lower right corner, next to the Pottery Barn ad (PBTeen.com)? That’s another neat little trick for increasing conversions from AdWords. It’s called “Seller Rating Extensions” and Google claims they get an average 17% higher CTR (click through rate) than ads without them. You can read more about them here.

Using Dynamic Keywords: 5 Tips

Earlier I blogged about using Dynamic Keyword Insertion for paid links. Here are five tips to maximize your return using DKI.

1)  Tighter adgroups work better.

Dynamic Keywords can help make your ads more relevant, but they can also make you look silly. Have you ever seen an ad that says something like, “Buy Abdominal Pain at Amazon.com!”? I know I have, and I doubt it performed very well.  You need to look at your keywords and make sure that they will work properly when the dynamic content is in place. It is simplest when all of the ads are on the same theme and have the same syntactical requirements.  After you launch your campaign, you can use Google’s Ad Preview tool to check your work.

2) Specify a good default.

The Ad Copy rules regarding character limitations still apply in the case of DKI. So if the dynamic ad including the dynamic search term exceeds the space alotted, the engine won’t show the ad that way. Instead it will show the fallback default option that you have supplied.  Don’t just punt here and write something that will fit.  Work the ad! Write something that fits AND sells.

3) Use case properly.

Each engine has it’s own rules for case. The help links will give you the details.  Remember to use the casing abilities you have at your disposal and test different versions.  Though the example above doesn’t include it, I’ve found that an ALL CAPS word can make a big difference in ads. Give it a try.

4) DKI is not just for titles.

Dynamic keywords are most often used in titles only.  Indeed, that’s a fine place to start.  In my experience, the titles make the biggest difference. However, I think agreement between titles and description can also make a big difference. I definitely suggest testing a version where you try a dynamic insertion in the description lines too. You can also test dynamic insertion in the display url.

5) DKI works in MSN/Yahoo too. Try “param” values in MSN/Yahoo

Not only does MSN/Yahoo Adcenter have Dynamic Keywords, it’s also has something that Adwords does not that can make your ads more relevant. That’s right, the Alliance is out ahead in this area. The feature is called “Placeholders”.  Placeholders allow to change your ads throughout your campaigns by changing parameters that are inserted in your ad.  These parameters are referenced as {param2} and {param3}.

Example: The ad text “All roses are {param2} and {param3}” could change throughout the ad campaign to:

All roses are 10% off and shipped anywhere in the country.
All roses are 25% off and shipping is free.
All roses are half-price and guaranteed fresh.

Like dynamic keywords, you can (and should) specify default copy for your placeholders. Learn more about placeholders here.

Dynamic Keyword Insertion Intro

Here’s a Quick Tip to help you get more out of your CPC ads.

Do you know what Dynamic Keyword Insertion (DKI) is?  If you do Cost Per Click (CPC) advertising, you should.  Dynamic Keyword Insertion allows you to insert the individual keyterm that triggered your ad into your text ad creative.  I’ve used dynamic keywords many times in Adwords and AdCenter campaigns and I can tell you that, in my experience, Dynamic Keywords DO generally improve your clickthrough rates. However, they are not a silver bullet and you need to know the details of how Dynamic Keywords work in order to get the most out of the functionality. This article is broken into two parts: this basic Overview of Dynamic Keyword Insertion and 5 Tips to Remember when Using Dynamic Keywords  Overview of Dynamic Keyword Insertion (DKI)

Dynamic Keyword Insertion allows you to display a different ad for each person based on what they searched. Specifically, it allows you to include the keyterm from the search in your text ad. This can be helpful if you have adgroups with many different keywords (or keyphrases) that are similar and will work when inserted into your ad dynamically. Done well,  the usage of the keyterm related to the search makes your ad more relevant to the searcher, i.e. “a better match”, and it will garner your ad more clicks (higher clickthrough rates).

Here’s an example. Imagine that you have a store that sells handles and knobs, including doorknobs.  You have an adgroup with keyterms for doorknobs, e.g. Glass Doorknobs, Chrome Doorknobs, Cherry Doorknobs, Bronze Doorknobs, etc.
If you wrote a single ad for the adgroup in the typical way, someone searching for “glass doorknobs” would see:

Doorknobs
100s of knobs to choose from. Free Shipping.

Using DKI, you could write an ad like this:

Buy {KeyWord:Doorknobs Here}
100s of {keyword:doorknobs} in stock. Free Shipping!

Now the customer looking for “glass doorknobs”, would see:

Buy Glass Doorknobs
100s of glass doorknobs in stock. Free Shipping!

Is that better? I think so (but I’d be sure to test!).

So, how do you do it? Basically, you have to put some code-like language within curly braces.  Of course, the engines each have their own requirements and using the exact syntax is important.

Here are the help pages you need:

Google Adwords
Microsoft/Yahoo AdCenter

Next up: 5 Tips to Remember when Using Dynamic Keywords  Overview of Dynamic Keyword Insertion (DKI)

Product Extensions Drive AdWord Conversions

google-product-extensions

We’re always trying to find ways to increase conversions from AdWords, and here’s a great one. You can expand your AdWords listing with extremely specific merchandise information by enabling what Google calls “product extensions”. As you can see from the photo, when I search for “order soccer trophies online” I get the expected collection of ads down the right side of Google, but Dinn Trophy has enabled product extensions, so their ad stands out in the crowd. They’re paying the same CPC (cost-per-click) regardless of whether a user clicks on the main text or any of the specific offers within the product list.

So how do you get this working? This article from Google walks you through it. You need to be using Google Merchant Center, but you’re already doing that, right? :)

The Power of Personalized Online Ads

My friend and colleague Andy Dunn was struck yesterday by the extreme personalization being done by Zappo’s, the now Amazon-owned shoe retailer. Andy had been checking out sneakers at Zappo’s and then left without buying.

Later, thanks to Zappo’s remarketing campaigns across a broad swath of third-party websites, Andy began seeing Zappo’s display ads everywhere — and the ads cycled dynamically through images of the very same products he’d been browsing at the Zappo’s site.

Dotomi, an ad platform, claims personalized remarketing campaigns like these can lift response 34% when compared to ordinary ads not customized to individual users. Dotomi and others have rolled out a slew of personalized products including direct text messaging, ads that address the shopper by name, and other tactics that might make George Orwell roll in his grave, but which many online merchants just love.

For merchants interested in learning more, the DMA is sponsoring a November 3 webinar entitled “The Future of Media Is Personal”, in which Dotomi COO and CMO Ken Treske will talk about the power of personalized remarketing ads and other media tailored to specific web users.

The Future of Media Is Personal